Never Under Estimate the Power of Rejection

   
 
Never underestimate the power of rejection. 
Rejection will initially hit you like a ton of bricks.
Crush your self-esteem and ego.
But only for a moment if you allow it, you can find that rejection can free you from what the universe may have been telling you all along was not the appropriate path for you. Sometimes, our hearts and minds lead us in directions haphazardly. It’s when we hit a stone wall that we become self-aware and can stand in our truth. To be honest with ourselves, we will have heartache over what we envisioned but reality will keep us grounded. Only allowing us to relish such unrealistic thoughts until we have overstepped the excitement of thinking to the actual doing. Sometimes, these fantastic thoughts can propel us in directions we never imagined. So, they definitely have their place in our lives, just not a permanent one. Once we stand back and view it for what it truly is…an educational mind-expanding experience….will we be able to approach the next challenge that eagerly awaits our arrival. 

Smoky Sweet Potato Burgers with Roasted Garlic Cream and Avocado



Please enjoy another great recipe from the Real Foods E-book, compiled by Health Coaches at IIN.

Smoky Sweet Potato Burgers with Roasted Garlic Cream and Avocado
(VEGETARIAN) (can be made Gluten-free with substitutions)

Ingredients

2 cups coarsely mashed sweet potatoes (or yams), about 2 large potatoes

2 bulbs of roasted garlic

1 cup cannellini beans (rinsed and drained, if canned)

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/3 cup panko bread crumbs (gluten-free, if desired)

1/3 cup garbanzo bean flour (or allpurpose, wheat, etc)


1 large egg, lightly beaten (or egg whites)

1-1/2 teaspoons smoked paprika

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/8 teaspoon cumin

2-3 tablespoons olive oil

1 avocado, sliced

2/3 cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream

1 teaspoon maple syrup (I used agave syrup)

extra salt and pepper for seasoning yogurt/cream

4 whole wheat buns (or gluten-free buns)

Instructions

Pierce potatoes (I used 2 large) all over with a fork and place on a paper towel, setting in the microwave.

Microwave for 5 minutes, then flip and cook for 5 minutes more. If not using a microwave, boil potatoes in pan of water until soft. Fork should easily be inserted into potato.


Remove, slice in half and let cool until you can scoop out the flesh.

In a large bowl, coarsely mash beans with a fork. Add in sweet potato and mash together, then add in spices, salt and pepper, minced garlic, egg, panko and flour.

Mix together until combined, then place bowl in the fridge for 15-20 minutes. This helps form them into patties, but as a warning they are still somewhat messy.

While mixture is chilling, combine yogurt/sour cream with 2 bulbs (squeezed out) of roasted garlic cloves, maple syrup and a sprinkle of salt and pepper in a blender or food processor. Process until smooth then set aside until ready to use.

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add 2 tablespoons olive oil. Remove mixture from fridge and form into 4 equal patties, then place in the skillet once hot.

Since the mixture can be wet and messy, do not move until they are fully cooked and golden on one side! This takes about 5-6 minutes.

Then, add more oil if needed (this really helps cook them) and flip burgers very gently. Cook for another 5-6 minutes.


Toast buns if desired. Assemble by topping burgers with roasted garlic cream and avocado! We also used caramelized red onion one night and it was delicious.

recipe by: Ashlie Sykora, USA
Ashlie is a health coach

Curb Your Child’s Sugar Craving

jumprope girl

Do you know a highly active child that seems to have an endless supply of energy? The behavior of these children can be frustrating and confusing. Parents may even fear that there is something “wrong” with their child. However, high levels of activity are typical of many children! Almost every child is very active in some circumstances, and some may fit this description more frequently than others.

These children do not necessarily have a disorder such as Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It is also important to note that an inattentive
child doesn’t necessarily have Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), which is
similar to ADHD but without hyperactivity. In many cases, diet may be a major
factor in highly active children.

Linking sugar and other ingredients with very active behavior in children is a
theory which began in the early 1970s by Dr. Benjamin Feingold. Parents who
perceived that their children become more active after consuming sugar-filled
foods have since furthered this theory.

Five easy ways to reduce sugar consumption:
1. Swap out sugar-covered cereals with an item that has five ingredients
or less – and keep sugar fewer than 10g or less.
2. When you pack a lunch – focus on whole grains, vegetables, and fruit.
3. Replace sugary sport drinks, soda, and juices with naturally-sweetened water, teas, or milk.
4. Skip the ice cream and serve icy snacks like homemade fruit sorbets and frozen bananas.
5. Switch out candies, cookies, and cakes with wholesome snacks and fruits (apples with peanut butter,
peaches and plain yogurt, whole wheat crackers and cheese etc.)

How you can calculate your sugar consumption?
One small cube of sugar is equal to four grams. Grab a box of cereal, a fruit juice, or a box of cookies from your refrigerator or pantry. Find the amount of sugar in grams in this item, and divide that number by four. The number you see is the amount of sugar cubes for just one serving of that item. Most often, we consume more than one serving and those sugar cubes quickly add up. This method will allow you to see exactly how much sugar you, or the small mouths you may feed, are consuming on a daily basis.

Want to learn more?
1. Recipes for kids: Have fun with healthy eating. Mayo Clinic. 2013.
2. The Feingold Overview. Feingold Association. 2013.
3. Smart Snacking. The Nemours Foundation. 2013.
4. Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity & Nutrition. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. 2013.
5. Liquid Candy. Center for Science In The Public Interest. 2013.

rewritten with permission © Integrative Nutrition

Our Deepest Fear

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Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate.
Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us.
We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God.
Your playing small does not serve the world.
There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you.
We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to manifest the glory of God that is within us.
It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.
As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

Excerpt from
A Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of a Course in Miracles
by Marianne Williamson

Real Food E-book by Health Coaches

siteLogo

As a student at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, I have had the honor of “meeting” many amazing people who are all interested in promoting health & wellness.  Through our combined efforts we have compiled several recipes meant for sharing.  I will be uploading the comprehensive free e-book which has over 100 pages.It is truly amazing and a great resource for anyone looking to try new healthy options.  Just to give you a sampling of some of the great recipes. I will be posting individual recipes which include the name and contact information of the author should you wish to find more recipes in that person’s specialty.

Enjoy!  Please tell me what you think!

Kelly Haigh, RN, BSN, HHC

cut-pumpkin

Pumpkin-Ginger Immunity-Mood Smoothie

VEGETARIAN, SUGAR-FREE, EGG-FREE, NUT-FREE, SOY -FREE, CORN-FREE

Ingredients:

1/2 cup organic pumpkin purée

1 cup almond or nut milk

1/2 banana (frozen or fresh)

1/2 cup gluten-free rolled oats

1-2 tbsp flax seed or ground flax (optional)

1/2” piece fresh ginger (more or less to taste)

1 tbsp maple syrup (or more if you like it sweet)

1 tsp maca powder (optional)

1 tsp camu camu powder (optional)

1 tsp ashwagandha powder

1 tsp bee pollen

Cinnamon & nutmeg to taste

Add ice if you like it super cold

Instructions:

Add all ingredients to a blender & blend until smooth and creamy. Remove & enjoy!

recipe by: Jenipher Minnaar, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

Wellness Architect

www.JenipherMinnaar.com

Jenipher is a holistic health coach who helps busy women create their own personal “Blueprint for Exceptional Health & Living” so that they can ditch the diet dogma, effortlessly lose those last few pounds, reduce stress and feel energized and balanced.

from a FREE publication, Real Food e-book compiled of delicious whole food recipes from the Health Coaches at IIN.

for additional information check out: Institute for Integrative Nutrition

This is produced for distribution without charge and meant for sharing.  Please pass it on.

Why You Need A Hug

I just love this website for it’s uplifting and inspirational comments.

Check out:  www.Happify.com

CLICK HERE FOR YOUR DAILY DOSE OF HAPPINESS!!! 

 

Happiness May Be Just a Tight Squeeze Away: The Link Between Mood and Touch

 

By Jessica Cassity

from:  Happify.com 

 

 

You know that warm and fuzzy feeling you get while hugging someone you really like? Well, part of that sensation comes from feeling cared for—affection is a usually clear sign someone wants you nearby. But much of the happiness-boosting power of a hug, a pat on the back, and even a squeeze of the hand is actually physiological, not psychological.

How Your Brain Reacts to Touch

“A number of studies show that when people touch you, your brain produces oxytocin,” says Paul Zak, PhD, director of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies at Claremont Graduate University and a self-proclaimed “hugger”. Oxytocin is that powerful brain chemical associated with bonding and relationships, characteristics that that have earned it nicknames including “the love hormone”, “the trust hormone”, and “the happy hormone”.

But the amazing powers of touch actually start at that first moment of contact.

When you hug, cuddle, or hold hands, the physical pressure stimulates touch receptors, tiny nerves embedded in your skin all over your body. A biological chain reaction is triggered when these touch receptors are activated, sending signals from the skin to the brain’s reward center. As these signals are interpreted, the brain releases oxytocin, producing a feel-good flow of chemicals. It sounds complicated—and it is—but this process happens almost instantly, thus the immediate boost in happiness and feeling of connection with touch.

It Doesn’t Need to Come from a Loved One for You to Feel the Effects

Hugs and kisses are two surefire ways to get oxytocin flowing, and one reason physical affection is often an important part of close relationships. But the mood boost from physical contact doesn’t happen only after touching a close friend or loved one: “All kinds of touch produce this sensation,” says Matt Hertenstein, associate professor of psychology at DePaul University and head of the school’s Touch and Emotion Lab.

Shaking hands with a stranger, giving a high-five to a teammate, or getting a hands-on adjustment from a yoga instructor can all result in this feel-good effect. And, as most people already know, so can massage, says Hertenstein. Even 10 minutes with a massage therapist (or a generous friend) will light up your brain’s reward center, get the oxytocin flowing, and have a big effect on your mood, not to mention help relieve aches and pains. Most scientists think that even self-massage—like rubbing your own feet—can trigger these sensations.

Why Touch Also Lowers Stress Levels

While these various types of touch are sending your happiness levels soaring, they’re doing another equally important thing, according to Tiffany Field, PhD, founder of the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine: “Touch lowers the production of the stress hormone cortisol”. You know how a big hug from a good friend can miraculously help your worries disappear? Science says this actually happens! The mechanism that causes this is still somewhat unclear, but Field believes it has something to do with the way touch typically slows the heart rate, shutting off some fight or flight instincts.

Get the Benefits

It may be cheesy to say “reach out and touch someone” but that truly is one of the easiest ways to trigger this positive chain reaction. If you’re in a romantic relationship you can probably come up with a number of ways to meet this goal. But there are countless ways to get the same sort of effect from interactions with friends, family members, acquaintances, strangers, and even yourself.

Here’s how:

• Have kids? During story time rub your child’s back. You’ll both benefit from extra touch.

• Regularly see friends or acquaintances? Become a hugger. Seriously: Paul Zak says he’s hugged thousands of people and he’s all the better for it.

• Like fitness? Sign up for a partner yoga class, a team sport, or an obstacle event like a mud run. Each has numerous built-in opportunities for connection.

• Want to volunteer? Altruism is of course good for happiness, but charity work that involves teamwork—like manual labor—likely has built in hugs and high-fives too.

• Squeamish about reaching out? Take matters into your own hands by learning a few acupressure techniques, giving your feet or hands a self-massage, or by lying on a tennis ball to roll out the kinks in your shoulders. Per Field, even skin brushing before a shower can help activate your touch receptors, so seek opportunities to put a little pressure on your skin whenever you can. 

Your body and mind will thank you!

Rewire Your Brain

 

Rewire Your Brain for Lasting Well-Being and Inner Strength

by Rick Hanson, Ph.D.


view original at: www.happify.com


  

The brain is the organ that learns, so it’s designed to be changed by your experiences. It still amazes me but it’s true: Whatever we repeatedly sense and feel and want and think is slowly but surely sculpting neural structure for better or worse. Sure, most of our mental and therefore neural activity flows through the brain like ripples on a river, with no lasting effects on its channel. But intense, prolonged, or repeated mental activity—especially if it’s conscious—will leave an enduring imprint in neural structure, like a surging current reshaping a riverbed. Day after day, your mind is actually building your brain (scientists call this “experience-dependent neuroplasticity”).

Inner Strengths: Growing the Good Inside Ourselves

I’ve hiked a lot and have often had to depend on what was in my pack. Inner strengths are the supplies you’ve got in your pack as you make your way down the twisting and often hard road of life. Inner strengths include a positive mood, common sense, integrity, resilience, love, or determination.

So what’s the best way to develop greater happiness and other strengths? It’s to simply have experiences of them, which help these good mental states become good neural traits. This is taking in the good: activating a positive experience and installing it in your brain.

You Can Use Your Mind to Change Your Brain

The science shows that each person has the power to change his or her brain for the better—what research psychiatrist Jeffrey Schwartz calls self-directed neuroplasticity. If you don’t make use of this power yourself, other forces will shape your brain for you, including pressures at work and home, technology and media, pushy people, the lingering effects of painful past experiences—and Mother Nature herself.

Why Is This So Important?

To survive and pass on their genes, our ancestors needed to be especially aware of dangers, losses, and conflicts. Consequently, the brain evolved a negativity bias that looks for bad news, reacts intensely to it, and quickly stores the experience in neural structure. We can still be happy, but this bias creates an ongoing vulnerability to …..(due to copyright of this material, please use link below to read the rest of the article at Happify.com)

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Adapted with permission from Hardwiring Happiness by Rick Hanson, Harmony Books. Copyright © 2013 by Rick Hanson